dark money

Cancelling Mastriano

Among the many extreme Republican candidates backed by Democrat dollars, Doug Mastriano stands out head and shoulders above the rest of the crowd. The campaign manager of his future opponent for the governorship of Pennsylvania, state Attorney general Josh Shapiro, spent hundreds of thousands of donated dollars on attack ads targeting Mastriano’s opponents — more than twice the total expenditures of Mastriano’s own campaign — in order to select what Democratic strategists believe will be an easily defeated opponent.

It’s a dangerous game, the same one that got Trump elected in 2016: The profiles of extremists are elevated by mass infusions of Democrat money, and mainstream news media supports the effort — understandably, but foolishly — by then exposing the extremist views of those who were set up for failure.

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Sports Desk: Did Biden Steal The Election?

Opinion

It’s complicated. You want simple answers, go find yourself a simple world to live in and grow sunflowers. The real world ain’t simple, and in the real world the answer is both “Yes” and “No”. My take on it, for what that’s worth, is: Uncle Joe stole the election, sure, but he stole it fair and square.

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F&L: The Secret Of PersistPAC

Now that the news has broken (props to Lee Fang of The Intercept), it’s finally OK for me to write this.  It’s been killing me for weeks, knowing that I’d never get confirmation.

A week before Super Tuesday, the big news was the formation of two SuperPACs designed to inject life into campaigns that had started to founder:  PersistPAC and (more…)

Aside: On The Decoy Effect

People are deliberately inducing anxiety in you in order to manipulate your decisions.  You’re already aware of this, at least subconsciously; consider:
How many coffee sizes are there?

If you answered three — either small, medium, and large or tall, grande, and venti depending on where you get your caffeine — then (more…)

On The Art Of Political Suicide

A year ago, Maine’s Senator Susan Collins committed political suicide live in front of the nation.

It’s safe to say that wasn’t her intention.  But hers was the last, and deciding, swing vote in the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, and that’s what everyone remembers.  Most of the Senate made their decisions early, whether along party lines or for other causes — not the least of which being to avoid the limelight; there’s no way to win votes on something like this.  (Heck, even I recused myself.)  But Collins didn’t rush. (more…)